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the u.s. economy and the fed's role in monetary policy. he called on congress to raise the debt ceiling in the release of u.s. can pay its bills. he spoke at the gerald ford school of public policy. >> thank you very much. it is also my great pleasure to welcome all of you here today. on behalf of the gerald r. ford school of public policy, the university of michigan is extremely honored to welcome the hon. ben bernanke, chairman of the board of governors of the federal reserve system. today's conversation is the latest in our series of distinguished lectures, policy talks at the fort school. we're so pleased that region white can introduce to the events and we're also very president marye sue: here today as well as -- we also have several of the university's executive officers and beans. i would like to welcome all of them and thank them for joining us today. it is an honor and truly personal pleasure to introduce our next guest. the fed's charges to provide a healthy economy. this is a complex and critically important mission and it makes the person at its helm one of if not the most
now our economy is growing and our businesses are creating new jobs. we are poised for a good year. if we make smart decisions and sound investments. as long as washington politics and do not get in the way of america's progress. as i sat on the campaign, one component to growing our economy is shrinking our deficit and a balanced and responsible way. for nearly two years now, i have been fighting for such a plan. one that would reduce our deficit by four trillion dollars over the next decade which would stabilize our debt and our deficit and sustain us for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt and the size of our economy and make it manageable. education and job training in science and research and all of those things that help us grow. step-by-step, we have made progress towards that goal. over the past few years and signed into law 1.4 trillion dollars in spending cuts. two weeks ago i signed into law more than $600 billion in revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans began to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we will
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
as a proportion of our economy and that means we're bailsically stabilizing, we're going to be okay. what do you say to that. >> i hope that's true. that means that economic growth will pick up dramatically and bring tax receipts way up and it will also bring spending way down awes get people off food stamps, off welfare, off unemployment. the best form of welfare is still a high paying job. stuart: do you believe it? >> i don't think it's true right now, no, i don't think these policies will do it. stuart: not now, obviously, not. debt as a proportion of the economy keeps going up. >> it's bigger and bigger, and the deficit doesn't seem to be getting really teenie tiny either, does it stuart? >> no, just not. 3 1/2 billion extra every single day. >> i know, amazing. stuart: tell me how it actually affects our economic growth rate. how does it it do this? >> well, now, with low, low, low, low, interest rates, it doesn't increase the use of tax receipts it pay interest on the debt. but as interest rates rise, which they will, it will have an enormously deleterious effect on growth rates. it reall
job creation and the american economy. today we will hear from s.e.c. commissioner danny gallagher who i think is well-positioned to lay out an agenda for this in the next year. we hope this is an agenda that can attract strong bipartisan support. mr. gallagher brings a unique combination of backgrounds. he started as general counsel for a financial services firm. then joined the staff of commissioner paul atkins and worked for commissioner, worked for the -- at the f.c.c. as deputy director and then acting director in one of the largest divisions. he's been on the senior professional staff, then was in private practice and about 14 months ago was confirmed by the u.s. senate as securities and exchange commission commissioner. i think everybody who who knows him will know several things about him. he is smart, he understands the complex issues. second, he is -- he has an ability to see another person's perspective and find consensus and make forward progress on issues and understands that you can achieve consensus while still remaining true to principle and finally that he is a great p
the american economy. >> also, need to tell you the president did speak about his gun violence effort. he's had the package put together by the vice president is on his desk today. and he will talk about it a little later on this week. want to bring in two people here, ali velshi with me from new york, and gloria borger there in our nation's capital, to you both welcome. ali, it has been more than a year since that whole previous debt limit debacle. and i know you are saying, especially comparing this to what we just saw on new year's day with the fiscal cliff, this is going to be much, much worse, much bigger deal. talk to me about what we're debating or as the president puts it not debating? >> what we're debating or not debating is the idea that the debt ceiling in the united states is a very unusual tool, only one other country has it. and it is because what used to happen is whenever the government needed to spend money, particularly when you're in a deficit, the treasury of the united states would have to go out and issue bonds in order to get cash to pay for it. and that was just a cumbe
of this country, because the consequences of a default would ripple throughout the economy of. this of i just saw an article yesterday that said the people are now drawing on their retirement funds, the middle class of this country. so we now want to have a debt ceiling threat that would cause further erosion in the stock market, that would essentially make things begin to go haywire? i guess the republicans are going to be sinking this weekend how to proceed. i think they need to proceed with sensibility and common sense instead of an effort to be so extreme that you threaten the economy of the country. host: house republicans leaving for a retreat tomorrow to discuss - guest: they should retreat from the idea of using the debt ceiling. host: the referenced the wall street journal this morning. -- you referenced. many republicans see a debt limit showdown as risky. pat toomey said tuesday he would introduce legislation next reconstructing the white house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have ha
is a bundle of joy for california's economy. a future worker. a future taxpayer, and a future buyer for your home. trouble is, there aren't enough women having babies. that spells potential crisis for the future of the state. >> i want to get married, have a career, all these things. most of my friends feel the same way. i think our generation wants to wait longer. we don't really see ourselves with kids in our 20s. >> maybe it's the economy. people with making sure they have enough for themselves first. >> we peaked in california in 1990. >> reporter: dell myers from usc sees a convergence of troubling trends. on top of a declining birthrate, there is a growing senior population. that means a shortage of doctors and caregivers in the supply pipeline to serve the aging. >> basically, there's almost twice as many seniors now per working-age person, or there will will, than tha there have been traditionally. >> reporter: aggravating factors are declining education opportunities and a higher cost of living in california. fewer people are coming to the state, including undocumented workers. myer
.s. economy and japan nikkei was up only slightly and they look to the yen as a good sign for exports. trading yesterday, the dow jones industrial average started today at 13511 and right now it looks like a little bit of a higher opening across the board for all three major index. apple gained more than 4% closed at $500 a share boosting the nasdaq. apple's stock is down 28% from its all-time high last september but the cupertino based company remains worth $471 billion and right now it looks like it will trade up to $2 a share this morning. >>> on the bay area, movies about steve jobs and they are about to premier. >>> a great white shark encounter caught on tape by some nervous fishermen, how long it stuck around their boat. >>> and plus you can get the morning's top stories while you are sleeping send straight to your cell phone at 6:00 a.m. text the word wake up by 70123. iyin)Ñ)ogóçÑóçíç'Ñy?oo . >>> two australian fishermen had a good look at a great white. they were fishing when this big guy circled their boat bouncing along the side of their boat even putting its nose on the e
. this is a positive thing for the city and the economy. >> the wrights flu in from florida. >> we -- flew in from florida. >> we're excited to be here and engage in an american tradition. >> despite all the people coming to town, there are still open hotel rooms. occupancy ratings are about 70% right now they were 90% four years ago. you can expect to see deals out there this weekend. reporting live in northwest washington suzanne kennedy. >> now as businesses prepare for a busy three days the transit is getting ready for >> the rush is on already as hundreds of people are inside trying to transform this convention center into a three-story party place. they have three days left to get ready for tens of thousands of party goers. in 2009, the president and the first lady appeared at 10 narble balls. >> the president will dance at all three levels. >> the top floor is reserved for the commander in chief ball and the only place you will see the presidential sale. one floor down it is set for the kids narble -- inaugural concert. >> brad paisley, jennifer hudson smoky robin
investors more optimistic about the economy. the dow is up 69. the nasdaq is up 18. s&p up 7. >>> an influential group of business leaders is pushing for an increase in the full retirement age. the business round table made up of large company's ceos -- companies' secretary of state, says the retirement age should gradually go up to 70. the group is proposing the older retirement age apply for both social security and medicare. members also want to partially privatize healthcare for older americans. they say their plan to help preserve social security and medicare for all americans. >>> 8:44. let's bring you up to date on some of the other top stories we're following for you right now. algerian forces reportedly raided a natural gas plant trying to free dozens of foreign hostages including americans held by militants. but the militants say 35 hostages and 15 kidnappers were killed by algerian military helicopters. they also say that seven hostages including two americans survived. no comment yet on this by the algerian government. >>> back this country, notre dame football st
the economy of louisiana expand, and basically progress. >> he's saying if you make louisiana a great place to come, companies will come. >> yes. >> peter: and people will have work? >> yes. >> peter: but the trade-off is, higher sales tax. so the question today is, that a regresssive tax? >> yes. >> peter: as you economists say? >> yes. >> peter: what does that mean? >> everybody pays it. no relation to how much you earn. it's how much you spend. you pay tax according to what you spend. a sales tax, it tax consumption. so in that sense, yes. it is regresssive. but on the other hand, if the absence of income taxes creates a growing economy, everybody wins from that. >> peter: some states don't have income tax. >> there are seven. i'll read them, alaska, florida, nevada, south dakota, texas, washington, and wyoming. on the map. these states have no income taxes at the state level. louisiana wants to become the eighth state and north carolina, may become the ninth state. even oklahoma, they, too, are considering getting rid of personal income taxes at the state level. >> peter: these are in s
. the 2013 ram 1500 with best-in-class fuel economy. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. >> welcome back. we're coming to you this morning live from newtown, connecticut. today marks one month since the tragic shootings that took so many young lives and so many lives overall. vice president joe biden is going to be meeting with the house of representatives, and finalize the recommendations that he'll give based on meetings that he has had with his gun task force and groups across the country. he is expected to recommend a couple of things. universal background checks and limiting high capacity magazines as well as encouraging more research into links between violent media and gun violence. >> first of all, it's sobering to be in this place here at this time. i just want to say that. i think the president is going to be more aggressive here in his second term on this. i mean, gun control is an issue that divides the country very closely. i think almost exactly in half. the reality is that the half of the country that
of the created conglomeration of the economy looks like for those and students here at the school of public health taught me about these opportunities to quantify attitudes towards conflict and aggression and we were able to show with a fall of 28 days surveys before and after the intervention that there was a short term improvement in those attitudes and that is in my talking and academic arena prevention outreach added to the conflict and aggression, 98 kids cross 13 months and then i was invited to go to new york. mayor bloomberg isn't here but mtv executives invited me to a video that had an antiviolence fema and i said that interests me let me see that. well, this was about eight years ago. my 15 year old was then 7-years-old but i didn't know much about 50-cent, the rapper that had this ongoing dual with jarule come and 50 have more credibility why? i told the story 150 times and shot nine times he has more credibility. but does that say about our culture of violence? taking credit by the way being shot nine times. [applause] the video that i salles enrage me to it was the same cultur
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14